Print Page | Sign In | Join AESP
AESP Members Forum
Blog Home All Blogs
Members - here's the place to share your blog articles, white papers, articles, and announcements about new product releases, awards, new branch offices and other exciting news. Log-in and post your announcement here. We'll review, approve and post them for other members to see.

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: Energy Efficiency  Apogee Interactive  customer engagement  Cadmus  energy  Franklin Energy  Franklin Energy Services  Franklin Energy Services LLC  customer engagement digital  digital engagement  Customer Engagement Residential Programs  corporate communications  energy efficiency programs  marketing  Residential Programs  customer satisfaction  DSM  Behavioral  Customer Engagement Energy Efficiency  Energy Efficiency Experts of Tomorrow  ENERGY STAR  fiveworx  Solar  111d  AESP One To Watch  Apogee  award  Customer EngagementResidential Programs  EM&V  Energy Analysis 

Apogee Interactive Launches Energy Platform for Information & Communication (EPIC) Targeted at Hard-to-Serve Customers

Posted By Karen Morris, Wednesday, August 9, 2017

New “EPIC” Suite of Digital Products Unlocks Engagement, Cost Savings

ATLANTA, GA – August 9, 2017 Apogee Interactive announced the launch of EPIC, the Energy Platform for Information & Communication (EPIC) that provides a compelling suite of cutting-edge digital customer engagement tools specifically targeted to low-income consumers, renters, and residents of multi-family buildings.  It shows them realistic ways to save energy and money that builds trust and customer satisfaction in this crucial (and growing) market segment.

EPIC communicates energy information targeted to customers who lack the ability to make significant home energy efficiency investments. It emphasizes how they can realistically control their energy costs and gives them meaningful insights into how small changes in behavior can add up to substantial savings. The platform is based on a customized edition of Apogee’s flagship Energy Advisor analysis application that provides customers insight into their energy use, habits, and trends. EPIC leverages email and texting to supply on-the-go energy efficiency guidance enabling families to take charge of their spend. Tips are tailored to a consumers’ household profile and can often be implemented right away with no outside assistance and at little or no cost.

EPIC’s capabilities begin with targeting the right customers for relevant program participation, then recruits and enrolls them.  Not stopping there, it continues with personalized progress reporting to keep customers engaged and motivated.  In addition, the platform includes Apogee’s most popular Special Purpose Calculators that give customers a unique look at the energy footprint of their household electronics and appliances. Optional engagement enhancements to the base EPIC offering include video messaging, alerts, bill explanations, and energy summary reports.

“Apogee’s Energy Platform for Information & Communication produces truly epic results for utilities and customers alike,” says Apogee CEO, Susan Gilbert. “While customers enjoy personal messaging with guidance about savings, utilities achieve increased customer satisfaction rates and lower operating costs from reduced call volume, improved cash flow, and less bad debt.”

For more information about EPIC’s advantages and how it could help you support your hard-to-serve customers, contact Apogee.

About Apogee Interactive, Inc.

Apogee Interactive is nation’s leading full-service provider of proactive customer engagement software services for utilities. A partner with the utility industry since 1993, Apogee’s digital engagement platform delivers on-line and outbound proactive, personalized communication to consumers nationwide. The company’s digital reach extends through more than 600 utilities to 48% of US households and businesses, increasing utility customer satisfaction and slashing costs. Apogee’s cloud-based, SaaS platform enables more meaningful customer engagement, proven sustainable energy results, and improved program performance for utilities. For more information visit www.apogee.net  or LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/99046/

Apogee Contact: Karen Morris – 678-684-6801 – kmorris@apogee.net

Tags:  Apogee Interactive  corporate communications  customer engagement digital  digital engagement  energy education  energy efficiency programs  home energy retrofits  low income 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Complexities of Home Energy Retrofits

Posted By Jeff Ihnen, Tuesday, July 11, 2017

As luck would have it, in recent memory, I’ve been to a couple t-shirt nights at MLB games. Yippy. This isn’t like the free shirts they give out at marathons, where you can take whatever size you need – you know, something that fits. No. Baseball franchises provide one crappy size, extra-large. It fits some of us, but the rest of us have a shirt that might as well go directly to the local Goodwill store.

Some deep energy retrofit programs are like the crappy extra-large t-shirt. Let us get started with homes, to which everyone can relate and understand. Trust me; large commercial buildings offer the same complexities, times ten. We will get to those later.

New Homes, 40-Year-Old Homes, 100-Year-Old Homes

Do ya think there might be some differences in how you, as a buyer, might outfit a new versus old home, whether it is energy efficiency or decorating?

New v 40-Year-Old Home

The 40-year-old home is a somewhat less efficient version of the new home. It may have 2x4 wood-framing construction rather than 2x6 construction. The average 40-year-old home is roughly 30% smaller than the average new home. The 40-year-old home will probably have vinyl or some other manufactured siding and gypsum board walls and ceiling, or if you’re lucky, some dark, light-soaking hideous faux-wood paneling. The 40-year-old home will have roughly the same electrical service capacity (amperage) as the new home. It probably has copper plumbing and grounded electrical distribution.

The 100-Year-Old Home

Moving into the era of the 100-year-old home presents an entirely different set of parameters to consider. Many of these homes were heated with coal or oil back in the day. There was no air conditioning, let alone central air conditioning. What did they do for hot water? Not sure – cook stove? They might have two ungrounded electrical receptacles in each large room. The interior wall finish is often lath and plaster, and it may have a nice decorative finish to it.

Ok, let’s deck this house out with the latest greatest energy efficiency. How about a ductless heat pump system? Oooh, I don’t know. A puny 1920 electrical service may already be loaded down with a 4 kW electric water heater and another 5 kW clothes dryer, and it doesn’t have the amperage capacity for adding central AC or a ductless heat pump system. Strike one. There are ways around this, like replacing the water heater or clothes dryer with natural gas editions, if natural gas is available, and it often is.

Let’s consider insulating the walls. This is not nearly as simple as sawing a two-inch hole on the interior wall or pulling back some vinyl siding and drilling from the outside. The interior walls may be made of tough cement plaster, and exterior may have decorative stucco. How are you going to get your blown-in-blanket insulation doohickey into the wall cavity without leaving ugly scars inside or outside?

Living Small

Americans’ homes have expanded in direct proportion to waste lines, and indirect proportion to family head counts, over the decades. With one momentary lapse of reason (1950), home size has ballooned steadily over the last 100 years, especially on a per-person basis as shown in the attached chart, courtesy of this site and The Wall Street Journal. The average space per person may not look to have increased that much, but dudes, we now have 4x the space per person compared to 100 years ago. Extra-large, anyone?

One other diversion I can’t resist – American’s drive more and more cars and build bigger and bigger garages. However, with many residences, the huge garages are full of crap while the fleet of behemoth vehicles sit outside anyway. Wow.

The moral of the living small story is it changes the calculus for the cost effectiveness of insulation. If you have a 1,000 square foot home, built in 1920, with decorative plaster, it may not be worth it to make a mess to insulate walls. Think!

Comprehensive Retrofits

If one considers retrofitting an existing home to be like picking among options for new construction, one will look like a fool very quickly.


As alluded to above, you have to think big picture.

  • Is the electrical service substantial enough to handle a large added electrical load or do you need to swap big existing loads for central air conditioning or heat pumps?
  • What about asbestos? Asbestos is a common substrate for many old hardwood floors. If you start chopping holes in floors for ductwork or anything else, zoom(!), go the costs!
  • Home size, room size, insulation levels?
  • Where is the condensing unit for the air conditioning going to go? Not in front. Not in the sun. Not there because I want to put a patio there at some point. Not there because it has to have clearance from the electric meter. Not there because it has to be at least seven feet from the neighbors’ lot line. Suddenly, the simple gets very complex.

See how it goes with the simplest of buildings – single family residential?

Commercial Buildings

Commercial buildings have many similar characteristics as homes for consideration – except for many other considerations. I will get into this next week.

 Attached Thumbnails:

Tags:  commercial buildings  comprehensive retrofits  energy efficiency  home energy retrofits  Jeff Ihnen  Michaels Energy  new construction  retrofit programs  retrofits 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Latest Tweets

Contact Us

15215 S. 48th St.
Suite 170
Phoenix, AZ 85044
whatsnew@aesp.org
Tel: 480-704-5900